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2013 in review

Here’s to another great year at The Quabbin Valley. Please visit again for exciting updates to come in 2014!

 

 

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2013 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

The concert hall at the Sydney Opera House holds 2,700 people. This blog was viewed about 15,000 times in 2013. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 6 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

I will simply state that this entry features Purgee Brook, which can be found by entering through either Gate 11 or Gate 12, both in Pelham, MA, found on Route 202. This entry is part I of a two-part series where the second part will be “Via Gate 12.” FYI Gate 12 can be found directly next to Pelham Lookout, while Gate 11 can be found directly across from where Amherst Road in Pelham T’s with Route 202. And through a series of twists and turns down old, abandoned roads, you will have the opportunity to enjoy more of the unparalleled sights in The Quabbin Valley.

The initial way past the gate resembles an old parking lot of sorts, ordering you to the right, down a very long yet modest slope. Enormously uneventful at the outset, this location holds some very intriguing and exciting blasts of beauty deep within its boundaries. One such unique aspect of this site takes little time to approach, and features actual street signs with actual names. Whereas every other hollow reservoir street typically wears it DCR badge on a sign resembling a street sign, but that which contains an assigned number instead, Gate 11 displays actual street names.

The main road at Gate 11 also stretches on one of the longest straightaways I have yet seen. Left and right tease the promise of cellars, property boundaries, slinking brooks that pass under the road, and so much more. At one T-intersection, a cellar hole holds onto the land at the corner. For years I had wondered what it would be like to look out from above one of the cellar holes and look outward as if I were a resident in the home before its removal. At last, this particular intersection, a cellar hole tempted to fulfill this wish. A Birch Tree had fallen over the cellar in just the right spot so that I could walk out on it and stand atop the cellar at the same height the former inhabitants once did.

As I approached the end of the road I canted my view toward the left, as some rather dramatic movement of fog had caught my attention. Having seen it, I began to rush to the end of the road in the hopes of getting to the water before it dissipated. Anyone who knows will be able to tell you that such events unfold with tremendous speed and drama, so there wasn’t much time to capitalize. When I would normally meander at my own pace while appreciating my surroundings, the reservoir called for me to meet its schedule on this occasion and forced me to pick up the pace.

Thankfully my efforts paid off in this case. The dew was so live on this day, that it was shooting off of itself like images from space showing the sun shooting off a solar flare. The water brought with it another surprise; another first. The first time I saw a live coyote within a stone’s-throw from where I was. The return trip was against the grain of Purgee Brook, boasting countless views of beauty as you would expect from Quabbin, as you will see with the included images.

The entrance road once past the gate

The entrance road once past the gate

One interesting thing about this venue is that it's the only place I've found that actually uses real street names instead of the normal "PT" signs with the gate number followed by a "dash-1" or "dash-2" etc.

One interesting thing about this venue is that it’s the only place I’ve found that actually uses real street names instead of the normal “PT” signs with the gate number followed by a “dash-1″ or “dash-2″ etc.

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FINALLY! I've found a way to stand over a cellar hole as if I were a Resident who once lived in the home. The next picture shows a view of the road as seen while standing on this fallen tree limb, just as the occupants of this home once would have!

FINALLY! I’ve found a way to stand over a cellar hole as if I were a Resident who once lived in the home. The next picture shows a view of the road as seen while standing on this fallen tree limb, just as the occupants of this home once would have!

The view from the fallen tree limb. This is how the road would have looked while viewing through a window, perhaps, inside the home.

The view from the fallen tree limb. This is how the road would have looked while viewing through a window, perhaps, inside the home.

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Seeing the fog through the dense forest, I raced to the water to catch a glimpse before it shoved off. So glad I ran! It was also in the vicinity of this photo that I saw my first coyote in the Reservoir! Ironically, it would be the last time I would see wildlife in the Quabbin.

Seeing the fog through the dense forest, I raced to the water to catch a glimpse before it shoved off. So glad I ran! It was also in the vicinity of this photo that I saw my first coyote in the Reservoir! Ironically, it would be the last time I would see wildlife in the Quabbin.

Near the mouth of Purgee Brook

Near the mouth of Purgee Brook

Purgee Brook

Purgee Brook

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Evidence of human presence. Apparently this is a popular fishing spot!

Evidence of human presence. Apparently this is a popular fishing spot!

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A hint of coyote

A hint of coyote

At first I thought it might have been a wolf!

At first I thought it might have been a wolf!

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My attempt at the abstract

My attempt at the abstract

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Mouth of Purgee Brook

Mouth of Purgee Brook

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Some of the largest culverts I've ever seen

Some of the largest culverts I’ve ever seen

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This concludes the pictures I got, but there's another half better visited from Gate 12.

This concludes the pictures I got, but there’s another half better visited from Gate 12.

 

 

Doane’s Falls

Doane’s Falls is located in Royalston, MA and can be found by taking Route 32 North from Athol, MA past Tully Lake, and then turning right onto Doane Hill Road. Then follow the road until you go up a small hill and come to a “T,” which yields Athol Road. Immediately to the right is a small parking lot off the side of the road.

When you get out, there will be a stone marker on a hill, indicating to whom the site has been dedicated by The Trustees of Reservations.

Doane’s Falls is a series of waterfalls that are emblematic of New England elegance in nature, and can be safely traversed and viewed from atop both adjacent slopes from pathways created and maintained by The Trustees. For an in-depth explanation of this site, as described by The Trustees of Reservations, visit the link above.

The site is relatively short and peaceful, so the pictures do most of the talking about this location. Though I’ve visited this location more than once, I chose the pictures I took on this day, in large part, because I was able to capture a rainbow this time and the weather was just right.

A word of caution before I close: there have been known to be many people who have hurt themselves at Doane’s Falls, so they have cabling rope along the edge of the trail. This should, in no way, create any unwarranted sense of security, and the cables are easily breached above or below their top and bottom lines. This is not the best place to take small children, though if you can manage to keep them close, the trail is as safe as any other.

Though you are almost assuredly going to encounter others during your short visit, it is still a very tranquil site where you can lose (and find) yourself in nature.

 

Entrance

Entrance

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An old grinding wheel with an inscription on its face

An old grinding wheel with an inscription on its face

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The rainbow. This day was filled with a lot of mist; likely the cause of such a great reflection

The rainbow. This day was filled with a lot of mist; likely the cause of such a great reflection

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One foggy morning, on my way to spend a morning out at Gate 11, I drove by Quabbin Overlook on Route 202 and noticed dense fog slinking through the hills below, prior to sunrise. I thought I could make a quick stop and grab a few sunrise photos while I was there, but had a long line of traffic behind me and didn’t think to stop until I was upon the turn. So I figured I would stop at the New Salem General Store to get some coffee and a pastry, then turn around and see what I could capture.

However, while I was at the store, the man working there engaged me in conversation, which led to me telling him that I was on my way to the Overlook for sunrise. When he heard this, he introduced me to a different idea; one he called “Our Lookout.” I asked him to elaborate and he told me that there’s a much better spot than Quabbin Overlook in New Salem Center.

I was initially uninterested because I meet so many people who have no interest in Quabbin Overlook because it’s just a small turn-off with not much of a view and so close to the road, and as I’m developing sunrise photos for this location, I often choose to ignore the calls for omission of this site.

In spite of my instincts to stick to the plan and Frag-order of Quabbin Overlook sunrise, the gentleman caught my attention when he went on to explain how New Salem Lookout was a nicer site because it offered a view of islands and water. Then he capped this summary by verbally illustrating how easy it was to access, yet how remote and secluded it was.

Across from the New Salem General Store are 2 or 3 different streets you can take to get onto South Main Street. Once on South Main Street, look for the Firehouse in the Center on the left, with a gravel drive just past it, its course bringing you east into the woods and behind the Firehouse. Following this road will bring you out to a basketball court to the left, and will bend to the right. When the road ends, you must park and follow the road beyond the gate, which leads directly to the edge of New Salem Lookout.

When you arrive, you’ll first notice tall, skinny trees and even some picnic tables to help make your visit more accommodating. The approach to this site is met with subtle sunrise shades on the backdrop of dense trees in the foreground.

I have to admit that the guy at the store was right. Toward the left view there is limitless horizon. Rolling hills were accented by the tumbling fog as it rolled through the valley. Looking forward offers more of the same, with samples of Rattlesnake North and Pittman Hill, but complemented by subtle trails of water meandering through those same sloping hills. Cast your gaze toward the right and you’ll see the islands as well as teasing hints of the northern part of Quabbin Waters.

The sights are stunning, especially on a partly cloudy day, as is the case with any sunrise, but does require some positioning and movement around the trees that sit stagnantly sentry atop the hill. I foresee many more pit-stops at this venue as I continue to explore the West Quabbin.

 

First Light

First Light

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Looking left

Looking left

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Looking right

Looking right

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If you acknowledge that all Quabbin Gates begin with Gate #1, then Gate #5 would be the first gate open to the public. Gate 5 is a neatly pleated away notch in the Quabbin’s southern region. By traveling along Route 202 in Belchertown, Massachusetts, you can turn onto Allen Street, just north of where Route 9 intersects Route 202. When you get to the end of Allen Street, turn left onto Old Enfield Road and follow until it concludes at the yellow gate. If on Route 9 in Belchertown, turn right at the intersection with Route 21, onto Old Enfield Road and follow it until it ends at the yellow gate.

One intriguing feature of this neighborhood in the Quabbin is that it has a brook of lengthy proportions, which has not been officially named. According to a reliable source, DCR Personnel refer to this brook as Gate Brook, though no one seems to understand why.

This particular brook can be made most readily available through either Gate 5 or Gate 6, so I made it a combined effort over the course of a week. Gate 5 offers a more uninterrupted route to the mouth of the brook, while Gate 6 provides more scenery, history, and character along a lengthier route to the top of the ravine where I had estimated its rushing descent to begin. To caveat and complement this entry, I will also note that Gate 7 provides the fastest avenue to the bog from which the brook draws. However, the bog and immediate output are relatively unimpressive compared to Gates 5 & 6 in reference to this brook, so it has been excluded for now, and will be introduced later, in a separate entry.

Another aesthetic feature of Gate 5 is that the water comes into view almost immediately. It’s not far at all before you retain a glimpse of it beyond the rolling hills. A deeper probe down the road produces a cellar hole to the left, with a somewhat complex network of foundation walls deeper into the tree line. Beyond that is a concrete pad that appears to be some kind of old driveway, with a small staircase on the side leading into where the house once stood.

Finally, once emerging from the canopy along the old road, you come to the water with one of the most prominent spill sites I have seen. The asphalt beneath the clear water is quite easily visible with current water levels, and is as black as the day it was laid.

Visiting this spot on the beach inspired a sense of nostalgia as it was the first time from land I saw Enfield Tower since I first went to the Quabbin and stood inside of it, the account of which can be found here. The defined break between land masses also marks the location that separates Quabbin Park from Prescott Peninsula, Hampshire County from Franklin County, Belchertown from Ware from New Salem, and a convergence of where once met the Middle and West Branches of The Swift River! One might argue that this spot in Quabbin is the heart of the Reservoir and lifeblood of everything since spawned.

Back up from the beach just a few feet and back onto the road that led you there, and you will find a wide footpath to the left. Following this path will lead you straight and unnoticeably uphill to a cliff that overlooks a spot I call Emerald Bay. Emerald Bay sets inward toward the mouth of Gate Brook but not before emitting some of the greenest shore water I’ve seen in the Quabbin Reservoir; its depth rather ominous as well.

The boding overview provides precisely the right culmination of reach and safety in viewing. To the left of the path, leading all the way to the edge, is a property boundary that you have to climb over and temporarily break brush in order to gain access to the mouth of Gate Brook.

On the way, an old relic exists. I discovered a Utility Pole still standing in the middle of the woods, still tethered to the ground by metal binding cable. Scattered fence debris also remains on the ground, utterly useless.

The mouth of Gate Brook stands blocked and obstructed by fallen trees and vegetative debris, still displaying much character and unique design.

If your intent is to engage in a longer stroll through the woods, with a less inhibited avenue to where the excitement in the brook begins, Gate 6 would be more advantageous. Following the same directions as earlier, you would go to the road immediately prior to where Allen Street meets Old Enfield Road and go north. After a short drive, the road ends at yet another yellow gate marked with the number 6!

This road past the gate starts uphill right away. An old cellar hole also graces this route on the right nearly as soon as you reach the crest of the first hill.

The remainder of the road is fairly uneventful except for an unmarked turn to the left at the highest point along the road before the point where it meets Gate Brook. I didn’t explore this turn, as it looked more like a DCR-generated opening and subsequent clearing than something of historic significance.

After a downhill turn, you can gaze down the slope to the right and see the brook passing by in the distance. A leveling-off of the road will display the culvert through which Gate Brook passes.

Accessing this brook requires a treacherous tumble along the ravine wall. The hillsides tower around the brook which, on a map, assumes a flourishing and cascading nature to the brook’s character. However, as this brook happens to fall directly in the middle of this valley, it somewhat disappoints the wayward waterfall-seeker. The contour lines on a map indicate that this should be a spectacle of Quabbin proportions, but measures at best to a misleading expectation.

The brook itself is, however, full of character and has quite a tantalizing array of inlets that create the sum of Gate Brook. Mini waterfalls litter throughout, from start to finish, but the brook is only a foot or a foot-and-a-half wide and perhaps a few inches deep. It does make for pretty pictures, but may be one of the few places in the Quabbin that are better seen in pictures than it is more impressive in person.

Yet again, a sight worth seeing, and one to which you can take the kids. Aside from the brook there are several other sights to see such as Emerald Bay and the view of Enfield Tower and the cellar holes. The cliff above the bay makes it well worth the trip also.

 

The road to the water

The road to the water

First sighting of water

First sighting of water

Cellar holes, property walls, stone network

Cellar holes, property walls, stone network

Perhaps an old driveway

Perhaps an old driveway

First sight of water from the beach. Enfield Tower on the hill in the distance

First sight of water from the beach. Enfield Tower on the hill in the distance

Close-up of Enfield Tower

Close-up of Enfield Tower

The separation of Quabbin Park from the Southern tip of Prescott Peninsula

The separation of Quabbin Park from the Southern tip of Prescott Peninsula

Spill Site of Old Enfield Road into the water

Spill Site of Old Enfield Road into the water

High view on cliff over Emerald Bay

High view on cliff over Emerald Bay

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Emerald Bay

Emerald Bay

Looking outward from Emerald Bay side view

Looking outward from Emerald Bay side view

Utility Pole

Utility Pole

Fence debris

Fence debris

Perhaps a nostalgic view of Quabbin, showing the mouth of Gate Brook

Perhaps a nostalgic view of Quabbin, showing the mouth of Gate Brook

Last cascade of Gate Brook before it opens to the mouth and into the water

Last cascade of Gate Brook before it opens to the mouth and into the water

Mini Falls

Mini Falls

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Moss-covered steps to the left of the old driveway shown earlier

Moss-covered steps to the left of the old driveway shown earlier

Cellar Hole in Gate 6

Cellar Hole in Gate 6

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Into Gate 6

Into Gate 6

The turn off at the crest of the hill. Unmarked on the map, looks like a DCR turn-out

The turn off at the crest of the hill. Unmarked on the map, looks like a DCR turn-out

The beginning of the falls off of the Gate 6 trail

The beginning of the falls off of the Gate 6 trail

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Good picture of the inlet streams

Good picture of the inlet streams

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I've been seeing a lot of these lately. Does anyone know what this is?

I’ve been seeing a lot of these lately. Does anyone know what this is?

Shown here is an emblematic shot of the ravine sloping inward toward the stream.

Shown here is an emblematic shot of the ravine sloping inward toward the stream.

Gate 16

The more I survey the West Quabbin, the more I recognize that it’s the worst place in the Quabbin Reservoir to take children. Very few of the roads are stroller-friendly and the preponderance of the region is an incisive, pitched descent to the east which can make it easier going in (though to some extent hazardous) but very taxing on the way out. The toothed hills do level off in many places, making northward and southward navigation comfortable, but such journeys are chiefly without incident and don’t lead to the triumph of making it to the water, thus creating a rather lackluster undertaking. Those roads that don’t depress with such dramatic exponentiation are long and windy and regularly cause kids to lose steam before making it even half way to the water.

So, for adults, the West Quabbin is as good as any, however keep the kids in any area other than the West Quabbin until they’re at least 10 years old. Not all is lost in the west, however.

The one thing I like about the West Quabbin is that it offers the best views of Prescott Peninsula from land.

Gate 16 is the northernmost gate in the West Quabbin, the last before you reach the Prescott Peninsula gates, and is perhaps the one and only omission to the West Quabbin Rule. You can get to Gate 16 by taking Route 202 until you get to the road leading to Lake Wyola in Shutesbury. You’ll see a sign posted indicating as much, which, in this case, is actually your indicator to park across the street from that westward turn. Gate 16 is one of only a few gates in the Quabbin that does not have the giant, yellow pole acting as a blockade, so pay close attention.

Once you park, you’ll actually have to break brush and walk along a narrow path in order to get to the main road. Gate 16A (slightly further north) will allow for direct road access, but is a longer walk as a result.

Once on the road, Gate 16 creates encounters with the characteristic Quabbin dead trees and sights and sounds found anywhere else in the Quabbin. Meandering down the road is as relaxing as always and eventually brings you to a frontal overview of the water, where the forefront hill drops stridently and has an uninterrupted view of the water, generating what appears to be a flush gaze.

When you arrive at the water, you are at the Northeastern-most point in Pelham, Massachusetts. A small island blocks your immediate view of the southward-looking channel, while winding left will offer a chance to see the northernmost portion of the West Quabbin Waters!

This venue is visibly frequented, frequently. Upon arrival to the shore we noticed rock formations created by a previous visitor who is apparently named “AJ,” as well as rock piles littering the coastline. As with many locations throughout the Quabbin, evidence of beavers is also copious.

On the day that my children and I visited, the ice was still present in abundance. The rising temperatures caused it to drift so much that you could see and hear the berg grinding into the land.

As always when ice is present, my kids and I enjoyed a game of rock-toss onto the ice to see if we could break it, which inevitably turns into a game of ice-shuffleboard when most of the rocks don’t break through!

I can easily parallel this venue to Gate 35, and will even go so far as to say that it is slightly closer to the water than Gate 35, however it is entirely downhill on the way in, which makes it entirely uphill on the way out. Still, the slope is relatively measured and the expanse short and rather direct (forking left immediately before the water off of the main road) so it’s less strain for even the little ones to make it.

2-Stars for this little adventure, but as always, well worth the trip!DSC_1169

Dead tree

Dead tree

A rather interesting look into the hollow of the dead tree.

A rather interesting look into the hollow of the dead tree.

After forking left, you'll go around a bend and have a clear view of the water.

After forking left, you’ll go around a bend and have a clear view of the water.

Small island obstructing your view of the Channel

Small island obstructing your view of the Channel

A view of Prescott Peninsula from across the water

A view of Prescott Peninsula from across the water

Northernmost basin of water in the west Quabbin Waters

Northernmost basin of water in the west Quabbin Waters

AJ was here!

AJ was here!

Rock piles. Look closely; they blend in rather well.

Rock piles. Look closely; they blend in rather well.

Giant ice plate that was shifting so much that you could hear it hit the coast and notice the movement slightly.

Giant ice plate that was shifting so much that you could hear it hit the coast and notice the movement slightly.

Beavers strike again!

Beavers strike again!

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Gate 52: War Relics

Most of what you read in all of my entries is the result of my own due assiduousness. I tend to hear gossip and fables from time to time about certain sites such as Gate 40, Quabbin Park, and Enfield Tower, which impel me to these locations, but I typically ascertain a venue and appreciate it for what my own impressions offer before I go home and look it up or ask around about it.

Inasmuch as I am quick to boast about leading and unprecedented discoveries like Briggs Brook, and in the same way that I assert preeminence and photo unveilings from locations like Rattlesnake North and some others, I think I should also exhibit an unassuming nature by offering credit where credit is due!

While I was in Afghanistan, my wife and I moved our family from the Suburbs to the Quabbin Valley. I was eager about the move because we had bought a house but also because I visited here recurrently as a kid and loved the area. As a result, I would get on the internet as frequently as possible to look at pictures and read stories about this area.

One search I conducted led to a discovery of some old, WWII Artillery miscellany left behind in the Quabbin. The blog, James Hunt Photography’s Blog, was the only place I could find on the internet that described the location in detail. James Hunt is a Photographer and though that link takes you directly to the page containing the entry I read, you should also check out some of his other posts to see the beauty he can capture with his camera.

In seeing the pictures that James posted, as well as other pictures you can find by conducting a simple search for “Gate 52 Quabbin,” you’ll be able to see the drastic contrasts between water levels at the Quabbin between [circa] July 2011 (when James posted his blog) and November 2012 (when I visited Gate 52 myself).

Gate 52 can be found inside Quabbin Park by taking Route 9 in Ware, Massachusetts, and turning north on the east entrance to Quabbin Park. Follow this quiet road past all the turns and signs and pull-offs until you get to Gate 52 on the right, just off the road.

As you get out and walk, you won’t be able to see anything seemingly unordinary, but just the customary picturesque highlights in harmony with everything else in the Quabbin Reservoir. A slight turn to the right and down a delicate slope and you will begin to look left and right at tall hillsides and rock walls from old property boundaries. As my kids and I strolled through, we were looking for the impressive relics left behind by the WWII generation.

At first it seemed as though this may have been a wild goose-chase! I began to question if I had read correctly; after all, it had been over a year since I examined the blog. I also didn’t recall if there were unambiguous directions to the actual site even if I was at the right gate. I wasn’t sure if it was going to be on the right or the left or on a hill or hidden behind one.

Thankfully, around a curve was the coveted prize sitting right next to the road, in the distance on the right side! In spite of how much anticipation I had built up over more than a year to see this, it was a rather haunting spectacle. In the distance you see the normal blue sky and reflective water, obscured and subdued by dense trees. The meandering road beleaguered with brown and golden leaves, a scrupulously rusted wall rests heedlessly as the vestige of a building placed above an old Powder Bunker.

Exiting the road and roaming down a brief gradient will bring you to the backside of the bunker where you can get a more detailed view of it from the “vault” level. As you face the bunker from its rear, you notice a crawl space to the left, exposing ventilation grids for the ammunition once stored inside, a door to the right but centrally situated allowing admission to the actual bunker.

The inner recesses of the bunker are well preserved but clearly no stranger to the passer-by and his vandalistic proficiency. Exiting brings you back out to face the old platforms, 3 total. Ahead of the platforms is the Conveyer, standing in the order of 15 to 20-feet into the sky, the contiguous base abides to exhibit its ammunition linkage left behind as well.

In addition to these relics are scattered structural debris, a table-platform, an observation platform, and another platform located on the crest of a hill before it depresses. It’s anyone’s guess as to what most of these remnants were used for, though as a former Infantryman I am familiar with the Conveyer, Observation Platform, table platform, and Bunker but unfamiliar with the purpose behind the rest of the platforms.

At the end of the road exists yet another Spill Site, the location where the old road submerges below the water.

Again, viewing James Hunt’s photographs, you will see an enormous disparity between natural growth and an alarmingly sharp dissimilarity in the water level. Conceivably, the Spring will cure us of this dearth!

This location is one well worth your time to see. It took me over a year from the time I found out about it before I could get out there myself and see it, but I’m pleased I finally did. History and nature are two of my favorite subjects, and this venue blends both of them very well. It’s not a long walk at all; one of the shortest walks to the water  in the Quabbin, and it’s paved the whole way so strollers are welcome!

 

Look closely at the top of the road. To the right is the wall to the Upper Bunker.

Look closely at the top of the road. To the right is the wall to the Upper Bunker.

Inside of the Upper Bunker road-facing wall.

Inside of the Upper Bunker road-facing wall.

Upper Bunker platform, looking to the Bunker's backyard where other platforms and Conveyer are located.

Upper Bunker platform, looking to the Bunker’s backyard where other platforms and Conveyer are located.

From behind: entrance to the Powder Bunker.

From behind: entrance to the Powder Bunker.

Crawl space on the left side of the bunker.

Crawl space on the left side of the bunker.

Inside of the Powder Bunker #1

Inside of the Powder Bunker #1

Inside #2

Inside #2

Inside #3 showing entrance.

Inside #3 showing entrance.

3 platforms behind the Bunker

3 platforms behind the Bunker

Debris

Debris

The Conveyer

The Conveyer

Front of the Conveyer

Front of the Conveyer

Remaining links left behind from spent munitions.

Remaining links left behind from spent munitions.

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Observation Platform

Observation Platform

Random platform, perhaps a sand table used as a model for the immediate impact area.

Random platform, perhaps a sand table used as a model for the immediate impact area.

Remote platform above a ledge

Remote platform above a ledge

Side view of remote platform

Side view of remote platform

At the end of the road, you encounter this spill site. This particular shot portrays the devastating levels to which Quabbin waters have dropped.

At the end of the road, you encounter this spill site. This particular shot portrays the devastating levels to which Quabbin waters have dropped.

Looking right from the end of the road

Looking right from the end of the road

Looking left from the end of the road.

Looking left from the end of the road.

 

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Images of Nature from Western New England

Mitchell R. Grosky Photography Blog

Photos for Your Review----If you are interested in my Main Website for viewing and purchasing my photographs, please use this link: http://www.mrgroskyphoto.com

James Hunt Photography's Blog

Environmental, Nature and Fine Art Photography by James M. Hunt, Worcester, Massachusetts.

My Magnificent Mess

Life in the New England Suburbs - one crazy, opinionated, thoroughly caffeinated minute at a time.

A Little Bit o' Everything!

Just another nature blog from New England!

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