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Gate 54A is the first place in the Quabbin I ever visited, and so it is first in my priorities of dialogue. This gate is one of four gates that pilot directly into Quabbin Park, and is nearest to Winsor Dam. Being situated in the vicinity of DCR (Dept. of Conservation and Recreation) HQ, it is one of two central avenues to access the dam and Visitor’s Center (the other road is not actually a Quabbin gate, but only a road leading to a parking area). The focal attraction for this ingress, however, has less to do with tourism, and more to do with landmark and with the best man-made view in the Quabbin; a place I call Enfield Tower.

 

Enfield Tower is sometimes referred to as Lookout Tower or Quabbin Park Tower, but is not to be confused with Enfield Lookout, which is north of the tower, down the slope, and does not proffer quite the same viewing range as Enfield Tower.

 

Gate 54A is accessed through a driveway in the Quabbin Reservoir which draws from Route 9 in Ware. When you get toward the end of this driveway, there will be a pullover parking lot on the right, before the road forks. If you opt to fork left (which is more of a straight-ahead direction), then you’ll need to park in this side lot because there’s a locked gate, as driving by anyone other than DCR personnel is prohibited. Otherwise, as I did, you may fork right in your vehicle to continue along the road.

 

Immediately on your left as you make that right turn, you can glance down and see a small waterway. As you move further around the left bend, you lose sight of all water and become inundated with forest on both left and right.

 

Your next view of the water will be via a picturesque seascape on the left that allows you to pull in, pull over, or turn around. Whichever you select, you’re sure to enjoy the view.

 

In due course, you will come to a rotary at the top of the hill. When you do, you will need to go through the rotary and take the first right in order to set about the short driveway to the parking lot beneath Enfield Tower. But look fast; almost as soon as you commence your ascent from the rotary, you can look to the right and up the hill to catch your first foretaste of the tower in its gallantly unassailable view over the Quabbin Reservoir. Once upon the inner recesses of its top tier, you will be able to see out of its Air Traffic Control Tower-like windows all the way from Mt. Monadnock in New Hampshire to Connecticut on a clear day.

 

Beneath the knoll to Enfield Tower is a sizeable plateau used for parking, and the driveway loops around the parking field along the ridge. However, you can park virtually anyplace except the length of the driveway to the tower itself; once again, prohibited except to DCR personnel vehicles. This open field/parking lot leaves copious room for vehicles to drive around the loop or park, while observing a comfortable yet proverbial bulwark between playing children and traffic. There are also a small number of footpaths available to the grown trailblazer in the Southeast corner.

 

The walk up the hill to the tower is indeed not for the indolent, however it’s effortlessly consummate by any person capable of walking by themselves. My kids, at the time ages 9, 4, and 3, were able to walk it, and I was able to push my 1 year-old in the stroller with no complications or real challenges.

 

Once at the pinnacle, I quickly understood why so many people get married there. The view from the ground alone was extraordinary. From that position, in front of the tower, you could see water below and mountains peeking through the vapor in the far west. The grounds are very well maintained and groomed. The vegetation is left to grow, uninhibited by man’s presence or persistent visitation.

 

Subsequent to climbing several flights of stairs, I made it to the crown of the tower and was able to look out and see much more illustrious views out of the large windows.

 

To the west is Belchertown, and to the north is Prescott Peninsula, now a part of New Salem. This view, which is almost all-inclusive of the Quabbin, should inspire at least a fleeting prologue of its history and purpose.

 

Now let’s back up to that fork in the road. After departing Enfield Tower and going back through the rotary and back down the hill to that parking area on the right as you come in on the entry road, I parked the car and then ventured back in the direction of the left fork in the road, but this time on foot.

 

To my children’s as well as my own excitement, we saw a family of wild turkeys itinerant in the tree line along the road to the gate. Wild turkeys are not an atypical scene in certain parts of the Quabbin, nor is it unheard of to bear witness to bobcats, beavers, deer, bears, moose, loons, and an innumerable host of other indigenous wildlife. The first we saw, however, was wild turkey!

 

Immediately upon crossing past the gate to Winsor Dam was a bridge that passed over The Gorge. At the time, the water level was relatively low, but an inspiring sight nonetheless. Soon after, the well-groomed grounds of Enfield Tower as well as the “remarkable” view of The Gorge became pale compared to the humbling majesty of Winsor Dam!

 

 

Your first glimpse of this Quabbin Wonder will be in the form of an enormous, pitched hill which is mowed from left to right, in aggregate, horizontal tread from top to bottom. A path on the left side of the road leads down to the base of the hill which snakes around through the backside of Quabbin Park. As you continue along the road, to your front and where the road ells to the left, you will see a pillared monument dedicated to the Engineer who designed the dam (and after whom the dam is named). As it states, the dam is 2,640 feet long and 170 feet high.

 

 

The high road, which spans athwart the top of the dam, begins by mirroring the snake-like course of the base path described a moment ago, but then straightens out across the overwhelming preponderance of the dam. On both sides are tremendous views; on the left –the sloping, grassy hill; on the right –the view of the water from its southern-most point.

 

 

As I trekked along, I encountered a Cedar Waxwing perched on the outcrop. Yet another wildlife encounter dissimilar to anything you might see in most other places.

 

I realize that birdwatchers and animal lovers will not see anything superficially exceptional with the wild turkeys and Cedar Waxwing, but understand that I am making known these sightings as a reference for perspective. We spent a sum of 2 or 3 hours in our first voyage to the Quabbin, and had seen 2 things that most of us had never seen before.

 

The Quabbin is an enchanting place. It lives up to its name as the Accidental Wilderness as well as the title of New England’s Best Kept Secret. Don’t consent to any of my diatribes filling your head with illusions of what the Quabbin is, because it’s something different to everyone, and each one sees every element of it in distinctive ways. Whether you are a lover of nature or not, an intrepid explorer or a couch potato, a hiker, a climber, a camper, fisherman, hunter, or computer geek, the Quabbin will leave a lasting impression for your entire life.

 

I would pioneer my life in the Quabbin with Gate 54A all over again. It’s a grand preliminary spot. The Visitor’s Center is in close proximity so you can get all the information the internet won’t provide and the view from Enfield Tower is genially teasing, as it allows you to see most of what there is to ascertain without being ensconced in its opulence. If nothing else, it’s a rousing venue to engage your senses and tempt a further, more intimate review of The Quabbin Reservoir in Central Massachusetts.

 

 

 

 

Below you will see a series of images with their descriptions for this Entry: Quabbin Waters. For those who are not familiar with this site, click HERE for photographs and a detailed account of this location.

 

 

Statistics:

 

Location:       Quabbin Reservoir, Quabbin Valley, Central Massachusetts

 

Latitude:        42.393361

Longitude:     72.298089

*LOCATION BASED ON MOST CENTRAL POINT, CURTIS HILL ISLAND

 

Overview:

As shown, the featured maps show an area of the Quabbin Valley located in Central Massachusetts known as the Quabbin Reservoir: water source for the city of Boston, Massachusetts and nearly 65 surrounding communities. The basic size and scope of the Quabbin Reservoir being so large that no hand-drawn map of noteworthy definition and scale is shown. Quabbin Waters are accessed through one of 3 gates: Fishing Area 1 (Gate 8), Fishing Area 2 (Gate 31), & Fishing Area 3 (Gate 43), encompassing 38.6 square miles of space, holding 412.24 billion gallons of water, spanning approximately 18 miles at its greatest length, and having an average depth of 51 feet with a max depth of 150 feet. It is fed by a sizeable number of small streams from the neighboring high grounds but yields its greatest flow from the 3 branches of the Swift River. It has 3,500 acres of land divided prejudicially among numerous islands, and Quabbin boasts an 11,000-acre cape as well as 118 miles of shoreline, 181 miles including all the islands. The 20 major featured islands are Bassett, Moore, Snell, Hamilton, Nelson, Mt Russ, Mt L, Leveau, Mt Zion, Carrick, Stevens, Southworth, Chapman, Curtis Hill (central location used for the purposes of this Segment), Parker Hill, Den Hill, Walker Hill, Mt Pomeroy, Mt Lizzie, and Little Quabbin Hill.

 

Descriptive Legend:

 

All maps shown are the work of other enterprises and are not to be misunderstood as the work of, but was only compiled by, The Quabbin Valley Chronicles© 2015

 

Some Quabbin Waters shown are restricted.

 

 

Shown Below:

1) An image of the Quabbin Reservoir in its entirety with surrounding areas.

2) Due Course image with yellow guide line, outlining one course taken leaving Gate 31 (Fishing Area 2) through the pivot zones in the north and heading southward to the channel west of Bassett Island and then along the east coast of Prescott Peninsula to the south limit and wrapping around to the east. From that southern limit, and moving northward at Baffle Dam and skirting along the west coast of Mt Zion, the yellow guide line moves through The Pass, between Mt Zion and Mt L to the eastern portion of Quabbin Waters. Then, circling around Stevens Island, the yellow guide line moves northward, along the west side of Leveau Island and to the uppermost basin in that region and returns to the channel south of the power lines, and end by maneuvering along the east side of Bassett Island and finishing at the boat launch.

3) An image of a boat running along the waters between Mt Russ and Prescott Peninsula.

4) An image of the greatest width of the Quabbin Reservoir, interrupted by Mt L, and showing a distance of 18,157.44 feet (3.438909 miles).

5) An image showing the greatest length of the West Finger of the Quabbin Reservoir, showing a distance of 61,657.79 feet (11.677612 miles).

6) An image of the greatest width of the West Finger of the Quabbin Reservoir, showing a distance of 5,823.29 feet (1.102896 miles).

 01.Full Unlabeled 02.Due Course 03.Boat 04.Reservoir Width 05.Length West Finger 06.Width West Finger

 

Shown Below:

  • An image of the Quabbin Reservoir as seen from a point above Leveau Island, looking southwesterly.
  • An image of the boat launch at Gate 31 (Fishing Area 2) (green arrow) and “Angel Island” (yellow arrow)
  • An image of Bassett, Moore, Snell, & Hamilton Islands, with callouts for Pittman & Rattlesnake (North) Hills, as seen from above the boat launch at Gate 31 (Fishing Area 2), looking southerly.
  • An image of Mt L & Mt Russ, the point where New Salem [previously] ends and [presently] Prescott Peninsula begins as well as orientation of Nelson Island location.
  • An image looking southerly from the southern point of the channel, showing Mts L & Zion and Carrick, Chapman, Parker Hill, & Curtis Islands, as well as Mt Russ.
  • An easterly image featuring The Pass, Leveau & Stevens Island, Mt. L to the left (North) and Mt Zion to the right (South).
  • An image looking southward, showing Chapman & Parker Hill Islands on the left (east), Mt Pomeroy at the farthest point south, and just north of it, Curtis Hill Island, positioning the southern location of Dugmar Clubhouse.
  • An image looking southward from the southern limit of where the restriction begins in Quabbin Waters East, Mts Pomeroy and Lizzie as well as Little Quabbin Hill Island.
  • 07.Leveau View 08.Launch & Island 09.Island Callout 10.Island Callout 11.Island Callout 12.Island Callout 13.Island Callout 14.Island Callout

 

 

 

Shown Below:         A series of lengths in the Quabbin Reservoir

 

  • Length measured from the boat launch at Gate 31 (Fishing Area 2) to the south limit in Quabbin Waters East, showing a total distance of 51,844.92 feet (9.819114 miles)
  • Length measured from the boat launch at Gate 31 (Fishing Area 2) to Angel Island in the Northern Pivot, showing a distance of 2,799.67 feet (0.530241 miles)
  • Length measured from the area on the water just south of the power lines to the open waters by Snell Island, showing a distance of 5,777.3 feet (1.094186 miles)
  • Length measured of Bassett Channel, showing a distance of 2,747.86 feet (0.520428 miles)
  • Length measured from the power lines to Prescott Peninsula, showing a distance of 8,768.17 feet (1.660638 miles)
  • Length measured of Bassett Island, showing a distance of 4,309.79 feet (0.816248 miles)
  • Length measured from the power lines to the inward sectional bay of the Prescott Peninsula-New Salem limits, showing a distance of 14,975.63 feet (2.836294 miles)
  • Length measured of Snell Island, showing a distance of 2,381.76 feet (0.451091 miles)
  • Length measured of Hamilton Island, showing a distance of 2,351.04 feet (0.445273 miles)
  • Length measured of Nelson Island, showing a distance of 1,809.88 feet (0.34278 miles)
  • Length measured of unlabeled island, showing a distance of 2,236.03 feet (0.423491 feet)
  • Length measured of Prescott Peninsula, measured across its span from northeast to southwest, showing a total greatest distance of 55,446.25 feet (10.501184 miles)
  • Length measured of Prescott Peninsula’s Holster region, showing a distance of 4,305.03 feet (0.815347 miles)
  • Length measured of Mt L, showing a distance of 9,789.1 feet (1.853996 miles)
  • Length measured of Mt Russ, showing a distance of 4,346.66 feet (0.823231 miles)
  • Length measured of Leveau Island, showing a distance of 3,966.52 feet (0.751235 miles)
  • Length measured of Mt Zion, largest island in the Quabbin Reservoir, showing a distance of 19,115.25 feet (3.620312 miles)
  • Length measured of Carrick Island, showing a distance of 807.8 feet (0.152992 miles)
  • Length measured of Chapman Island, showing a distance of 2,210.72 feet (0.418697 miles)
  • Length measured from iconic Soapstone Hill’s peak to Quabbin Waters, showing a total ground distance of 1,709.19 feet (0.32371 miles)
  • Length measured of the peak of iconic Soapstone Hill to The Pass, showing a total ground distance of 9,745.59 feet (1.845756 miles)
  • Length measured of The Pass from the north point of Mt Zion and measured to the south point of Mt L, showing a distance of 988.19 feet (0.187157 miles)
  • Length measured of Curtis Hill Island, home of Dugmar Clubhouse, showing a distance of 3,949.13 feet (0.747941 miles)
  • Length measured from Quabbin Waters to the site of Dugmar Clubhouse on Curtis Hill Island, showing a total ground distance of 178.05 feet (0.033722 miles)
  • Length measured of Parker Hill Island, showing a distance of 3,698.25 feet (0.700426 miles)
  • Length measured of an island south of Baffle Dam, showing a distance of 2,047.55 feet (0.387794 miles)
  • Length measured of Mt Pomeroy, showing a distance of 4,839.95 feet (0.916657 miles)
  • Length measured of Mt Lizzie, showing a distance of 3,459.43 feet (0.655195 miles)
  • Length measured of Little Quabbin Hill Island, showing a distance of 9,428.34 feet (1.78567 miles)
  • 15.Length Launch-to-South Limit 16.Length Launch-to-Island 17.Length Bassett Channel Wide 18.Length Bassett Channel 19.Length Bassett-to-Prescott21.Length Bassett-to-Prescott Inward20.Length Bassett Island  22.Length Snell 23.Length Hamilton 24.Length Nelson 25.Length Unlabeled 26.Length Prescott 27.Length Holster28.Length L28.Length Russ
  • 29.Length Leveau 30.Length Zion  31.Length Carrick 32.Length Chapman 33.Length Soapstone 34.Length Soapstone-to-The Pass 35.Length The Pass 36.Length Curtis 37.Length Water-to-Dugmar 38.Length Parker 39.Length Baffle Island 40.Length Pomeroy 41.Length Lizzie 42.Length LQHI

Below you will see a series of images with their descriptions for this Entry: Gate 29. For those who are not familiar with this site, click HERE for photographs and a detailed account of this location.

Statistics:

Location: New Salem, Massachusetts

Latitude: 42º 32’ 8.026”
Longitude: 72º 18’ 38.685”
Altitude: 570.8661417’

Overview:
As shown, the map below shows an area of the North Quabbin Reservoir region, in the Quabbin Valley of Massachusetts. This maps faces north and features boundaries beginning in the lower-left portion of the map at Shutesbury Road in New Salem, Massachusetts. Follow north along Route 202 to New Salem Center, and northwest along Wendell Road and Moosehorn Road, then reaching eastward, crossing Route 202 again and extending to an area east of Blackington Road, edged by North and South Spectacle Ponds in New Salem, Massachusetts. Moving south along the eastern portion of the East Quabbin Watershed, to the vicinity of Soapstone Hill and Gate 36 in the Quabbin Reservoir. This map features locations such as those mentioned already, in addition to Fishing Area 1 (FA1), several brooks, Gates 22-36, hills including Rattlesnake Hill [North], Pittman Hill, Adams Hill, and Harris Hill. Bassett, Moore, Snell, Hamilton, & Nelson Islands, and Bassett Pond also included. The feature for this Entry is Gate 29, located on Route 202 in New Salem, Massachusetts, along the extension of a road known as Elm Street, along which the Swift River Valley Historical Society is located outside of the reservoir.

image

PDF NOT AVAILABLE

Descriptive Legend:

Yellow lines indicate paved or frequently used roads open to the public. Some extensions of these roads may be blocked and/or restricted.

Red diagonal lines indicate restricted areas

Green, dotted lines indicate hiking pathways

Brown lines indicate roads once used before the flooding of the Reservoir.

Blue lines indicate brooks, streams, creeks, or other flowing waters. Any filled in blue shape indicates a body of water. Any blue outline of a shape indicates a bog, swamp, or other still/stagnant waters.

Any marks in pencil indicate a description of a location.

All Quabbin Waters shown are unrestricted.

Shown Below:
Southbound view of Route 202 near Gate 29. On the right is Elm Street, leading toward the Swift River Valley Historical Society. On the left is the parking lot and entrance to Gate 29.

image

Shown Below:
Inward Google Street view of Gate 29 and the parking area.

image

Shown Below:
Track View showing the course taken on most journeys. From the top (north), enter through Gate 29 and follow the road (yellow line) until the apparent “T.” Maintaining a straighter path (shown as left on map and indicated as “Route In”) brings the yellow line south and on the west side of Rattlesnake (North) until you reach the water. Coursing eastward through the forest extends the yellow line southward along the west side of Pittman Hill. A sharp northward and subsequent northeastern path along the yellow line indicates a direct hike through the middle of Pittman Hill to its peak (indicated as “Route Out”). Moving northwest from the top of Pittman Hill is the downslope followed by the upslope of Rattlesnake Hill (North). An incisive cut to the east shows a rapid descent off of Rattlesnake (North) and onto the east pathway that skirts Quabbin Waters, crossing under the power lines, and wrapping back to the west where the initial path meets. Total distance from Gate-Gate is 38,453.6 feet (7.28 miles).

image

Shown Below:
Key points & areas along the course. Beginning at Gate 29, the parking area and southward roadway still considered an extension of Elm Street in New Salem, MA until it meets with Orange-Millington Road entering through Gate 30 toward the east. From that intersection, Orange-Millington Road continues until it ends by the water, featuring such sites as the former location of Herrick’s Tavern and an old well near a cliff that offers a clear view of the water. Another road, Belden Hill Road, also falls along the way. From the southern-most tip and moving northward, Pittman and Rattlesnake Hills are featured along with Regulating Dam Road, leading out to Gate 31 (Fishing Area 2). Lengths of Red-Line Roads not calculated.

image

Shown Below:
Inclusive length of Elm Street and Orange-Millington Road (known also as only Millington Road), calculated from Gate 29 to the intersection of the two, and continuing onward to the southern base where it meets the water at Rattlesnake Hill (North). This course being the most frequently traveled at its distance of 13,604.33 feet (2.58 miles).

image

Shown Below:
An extension of that which was previously described to include the route eastward through the forest and then southward to the water by Pittman Hill; a distance total of 19,025.36 feet (3.60 miles).

image

Shown Below:
The course of Rattlesnake Hill (North) in the Quabbin Reservoir from southern base to northern base, measuring 3,356.68 (0.64 miles) map length, and 3,356.75 feet (0.64 miles) ground length. The location of the former site of Herrick’s Tavern also shown, painting a clearer picture of the “T” mentioned earlier.

image

Shown Below:
Elevation of Rattlesnake Hill (North) shown at 1,052.22 feet (0.20 miles) map length and 1,091.76 feet (0.21 miles) ground length.

image

Shown Below:
The course of Pittman Hill in the Quabbin Reservoir from southern base to northern base, measuring 3,742.21 feet (0.71 miles) map length, and 3,742.28 feet (0.71 miles) ground length.

image

Shown Below:
Elevation of Pittman Hill shown at 750.54 feet (0.14 miles) map length and 795.62 feet (0.15 miles) ground length.

image

Shown Below:
Elevation of cliff at the end of Gate 29, Orange-Millington Road measured at 78.56 feet (0.01 miles) map length, and 80.89 feet (0.02 miles) ground length.

image

Shown Below:
Topographic map of the areas surrounding the locations of Gates 29 & 30, as well as showing the locations of Rattlesnake & Pittman Hills.

image

Shown Below:
Topographic map of defined area and several broad views of surrounding communities and their respective elevations.

image

Shown Below:
Close-up Topographic map of Rattlesnake and Pittman Hills, displaying the contrast in differing composition; Rattlesnake being a more broadly based hill and Pittman being one of sharper elevation with a narrower ridgeline.

image

Shown Below:
Topographic map indicating the locations of Gates 29 & 30 with their visual elevations.

image

Shown Below:
Topographic map showing the elevation of Rattlesnake, Harris, Fairview, & Bassett Hills.

image

Shown Below:
Map showing bicycle access for the Gate 29 area, exemplifying how one could enter through Gate 29 and reach as far as the base of Soapstone Hill on Bicycle.

image

-Q

Below you will see a series of images with their descriptions for this Entry: Gate 30. For those who are not familiar with this site, click HERE for photographs and a detailed account of this location.

 

 

Statistics:

 

Location:            New Salem, MA

 

Latitude:             42º 32’ 4.159”

Longitude:             72º 18’ 7.157”

Altitude:            561.023622’

 

Overview:

As shown, the map below shows an area of the North Quabbin Reservoir region, in the Quabbin Valley of Massachusetts. This maps faces north and features boundaries beginning in the lower-left (southeast) portion of the map at Shutesbury Road in New Salem, Massachusetts. Follow north along Route 202 to New Salem Center, and northwest along Wendell Road and Moosehorn Road, then reaching eastward, crossing Route 202 again and extending to an area east of Blackington Road, edged by North and South Spectacle Ponds in New Salem, Massachusetts. Moving south along the eastern portion of the East Quabbin Watershed, to the vicinity of Soapstone Hill and Gate 36 in the Quabbin Reservoir. This map features locations such as those mentioned already, in addition to Fishing Area 1 (FA1), several brooks, Gates 22-36, hills including Rattlesnake Hill [North], Pittman Hill, Adams Hill, and Harris Hill,Bassett, Moore, Snell, Hamilton, & Nelson Islands, and Bassett Pond. The feature for this Entry is Gate 30, located on Route 122 in New Salem, Massachusetts, immediately south of the turn at Route 202, directly across from Orange Road, and on what is known as Orange-Millington Road. Iconic landmarks for this site include Keystone Bridge, a site explained in the link above.

SCN_0001

SCN_0001

 

Descriptive Legend:

 

Yellow lines indicate paved or frequently used roads open to the public. Some extensions of these roads may be blocked and/or restricted.

 

Red diagonal lines indicate restricted areas

 

Green, dotted lines indicate hiking pathways

 

Brown lines indicate roads once used before the flooding of the Reservoir.

 

Blue lines indicate brooks, streams, creeks, or other flowing waters. Any filled in blue shape indicates a body of water. Any blue outline of a shape indicates a bog, swamp, or other still/stagnant waters.

 

Any marks in pencil indicate a description of their location.

 

All Quabbin Waters shown are unrestricted.

 

 

Shown Below:

Google Street Views of the area immediately outside Gate 30. Image 1 shows Route 122 as seen traveling southward; Orange Road on the left and the parking area to Gate 30 on the right. Image 2 shows the view of the parking area, with the actual gate faintly visible.

1

2

Shown Below:

An aerial Google image of the Swift River snaking toward Gate 30, as well as the actual location of Keystone Bridge, hovering over the Swift River as it passes through on its way to the reservoir. Shown in the 2nd image is the distance from the gate to where the bridge begins at 176.75’ (.033 miles).

3

4

 

Shown Below:

The outlet that meets up with inbound trails from Gate 29 and leading into an area formerly known as Millington.

5

 

Shown Below:

Topographic maps pointing toward Gate 30 and Keystone Bridge. 2nd image shows a close-up with a red circle, inside of which both items fall.

6

7

 

Shown Below:

A map showing bicycle access throughout the Gate 30 area, illustrating how the road network can traverse from as far north as Gate 29, reaching as far south as the lands surrounding Soapstone Hill.

8

Below you will see a series of images with their descriptions for this Entry: Gate 40 in the Quabbin Reservoir. For those who are not familiar with this site, click HERE for photographs and a detailed account of this location.

 

 

Statistics:

 

Location:            Route 32A, Petersham, MA

(Formerly Dana, MA)

Latitude:             42º 25’ 20.267”

Longitude:          72º 13’ 37.188”

Altitude:              554.4619423’

 

Overview:

                        As shown, this map exhibits all points beginning from the northeast quadrant of Mt Zion in the lower-left, extending eastward to the Pottapaug Borough and north of, edging Route 32A along the eastern frame of the map. The northern segment of this map begins with Mt L on the western periphery, and scanning eastward across regions of what is now a peninsula and that which was previously identified as Northern Dana, MA, just south of Soapstone Hill, and continuing eastward just past the junction of the East Branch of Fever Brook and Camel’s Hump Road. Points of interest include Rattlesnake Hill [South], Doubleday Village, Camel’s Hump Hill, Whitney Hill, Skinner Hill, and Pottapaug Hill as well as Pottapaug Pond, but the inner focus of this Map Entry centers on Gate 40 in the Quabbin Reservoir, with its main road extending to an area known as Dana Town Common.

SCN_0001

SCN_0001

 

 

Descriptive Legend:

 

Yellow lines indicate paved or frequently used roads open to the public. Some extensions of these roads may be blocked and/or restricted.

 

Red diagonal lines indicate restricted areas

 

Green, dotted lines indicate hiking pathways

 

Brown lines indicate roads once used before the flooding of the Reservoir.

 

Blue lines indicate brooks, streams, creeks, or other flowing waters. Any filled in blue shape indicates a body of water. Any blue outline of a shape indicates a bog, swamp, or other still/stagnant waters.

 

Any marks in pencil indicate a description of their location.

 

All Quabbin Waters shown are unrestricted.

 

 

Shown Below:

A Google Street-View image of Route 32A heading south. On the right is the location of Gate 40.

1

 

 

Shown Below:

Closer examination of the entry point to Gate 40 shows     “G-40” spray painted onto the guard rail. Forward of the turn-off from the road show the parking area on the left, and paved road forward of that position.

2

 

 

Shown Below:

The main road leading to Dana Town Common, a common attraction for all Quabbin Visitors. The distance from the parking area to the first side road moving to southeast, toward Pottapaug Pond is 8,141.46’ (1.54 miles). Casual walks along this road and up to this point will reveal several gorgeous leys and intricately laid cellar holes, stone wall property boundaries, and foundations.

3

 

 

Shown Below:

The spread of the entire route from the parking area to the monument located in Dana Town Common shows 9,472.14’ (1.79 miles) as the distance. From this view, all of the pathways, in greater detail than the drawn map above, can be seen shooting off in every direction. This location is renowned for its bike-friendly roads, being paved and wide enough to accommodate pedestrian and bicycle traffic without impeding one another’s ability to navigate.

4

 

 

Shown Below:

A Google Image close-up of Dana Town Common, featuring sites such as the cemetery, Town Hall cellar hole, monument, and cobblestone foundation. For pictures, see the link at the top of this Entry.

5

 

 

Shown Below:

Bicycle access for the vicinity of Dana Town Common.

6

 

 

Shown Below:

A series of topographical maps depicting the elevation of the Dana Town Common area, indicated by the brown contour lines.

7 8 9 10

 

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